School of Marine Sciences

Detecting scallop spawning

Skylar Bayer, who graduated last spring from the University of Maine with a Ph.D. in marine biology, has been studying scallops for six years in professor Richard Wahle’s lab at the Darling Marine Center. Her research addresses questions about scallop reproduction. Scallops are broadcast spawners, releasing their eggs and sperm separately into the water. Fertilization […]

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Sturgeon sojourn

Atlantic sturgeon that summer in Maine’s Penobscot River estuary can be found in the fall and winter in waters as far away as Nova Scotia and New York City, according to a seven-year study of the fish that is one of the planet’s oldest living fossils. The study’s findings are helping to identify the fish’s […]

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Longer summers

Summer is coming to the Gulf of Maine — warmer than ever and as much as two months longer than just three decades ago, according to a research team led by Andrew Thomas of the University of Maine School of Marine Sciences. The study, published in the journal Elementa, examined the seasonality of sea surface […]

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melissa student boat ocean water dmc

Diving into Aquaculture

Melissa Britsch shares her reflections on her recently completed Aquaculture Internship at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center in Walpole. Melissa’s internship and the research she conducted was supported by both state and federal government sources*, along with in-kind support from the Darling Marine Center. Melissa with scallops in Clarks Cove I came to […]

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Morse to give oyster harvesting talk in Newcastle, Boothbay Register reports

Boothbay Register reported Dana Morse, an aquaculture researcher with Maine Sea Grant who works at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center, will talk about the oyster harvesting process Nov. 28 in Newcastle. From 3 to 4 p.m., Morse will speak at the Lincoln Home about why the Damariscotta River produces some of the best-tasting oysters, […]

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Strong speaks with Press Herald for article on ocean acidification

Aaron Strong, an assistant professor of marine policy at the University of Maine, was interviewed by the Portland Press Herald for the article, “State largely ignores role as seas grow more acidic.” Despite a bipartisan recognition of a threat to Maine’s shellfish industry, leadership on ocean acidification has fallen to a volunteer group of scientists and conservationists, […]

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Wells speaks with Press Herald about toxic algae blooms

Mark Wells, a marine biology professor at the University of Maine, spoke with the Portland Press Herald for the article, “Maine plans swifter protocols for shellfish monitoring.” A toxic bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia, a common phytoplankton, closed hundreds of miles of Maine coastline to shellfish harvesting this fall and caused a recall of 58,500 pounds of blue mussels […]

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The Fish Site reports on salmon embryo research

The Fish Site reported on University of Maine research led by LeeAnne Thayer, a Ph.D. candidate in marine sciences, and Heather Hamlin, an assistant professor of aquaculture and marine biology. Beginning in 2000, fertilized salmon eggs began dying in large numbers, and the average survival rate fell from 80 to 50 percent. After five years of […]

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Grad student cited in Maine Public report on Atlantic bluefin tuna stocks

Brenda Rudnicky, a marine biology graduate student at the University of Maine, was mentioned in the Maine Public report, “Atlantic bluefin tuna stocks are rebounding — But how high should the quota be raised?” Once severely depleted, populations of the prized sushi fish appear to be rebuilding up and down the New England coast. Now […]

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UMaine lobster study cited in BDN article on Sen. Collins, climate change

Research from the University of Maine was cited in the Bangor Daily News article, “Susan Collins: Ignoring climate change is ‘simply not a solution.’” The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than 99 percent of the world’s bodies of saltwater, and that warming trend could mean smaller catches as lobsters move into deeper and colder […]

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