School of Biology and Ecology

BBC Future quotes McGill in article on animals thriving in the Anthropocene

Brian McGill, a professor of ecological modeling at the University of Maine, spoke with BBC Future for an article about how some animals are thriving in the Anthropocene, an era defined by humanity’s impact on the planet. McGill noted human impact on local ecologies can sometimes have unexpected effects. He pointed to a study published in 2014 […]

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BBC Future quotes McGill in article on animals thriving in the Anthropocene

Brian McGill, a professor of ecological modeling at the University of Maine, spoke with BBC Future for an article about how some animals are thriving in the Anthropocene, an era defined by humanity’s impact on the planet. McGill noted human impact on local ecologies can sometimes have unexpected effects. He pointed to a study published […]

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AP reports on new bee-mapping tool for Maine blueberry growers

The Associated Press reported on a new tool developed by University of Maine scientists that allows blueberry growers to learn how many bees they can expect to see around their fields. “BeeMapper” will be unveiled July 19 at Blueberry Hill Farm in Jonesboro as part of the UMaine Cooperative Extension’s annual Wild Blueberry Summer Field […]

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bee mapper

UMaine researchers to unveil wild bee habitat assessment tool July 19

University of Maine researchers have developed a tool called “BeeMapper” that will allow blueberry growers to assess the predicted wild bee abundance in the landscape surrounding their crop fields. They will debut and demonstrate the computer-based tool on Wednesday, July 19 at the UMaine Cooperative Extension annual Wild Blueberry Summer Field Day at Maine Agricultural […]

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The Atlantic quotes Gill in article on animal population declines, extinctions

Jacquelyn Gill, a professor of paleoecology at the University of Maine, was quoted in the Atlantic article, “It’s a mistake to focus just on animal extinctions.” Researchers state that fixating on the concept of extinction can lead scientists to overestimate the state of the planet’s health, according to the article. If a species is completely wiped out, […]

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Aroostook Republican reports on potato beetle cannibalism

Andrei Alyokhin, director of the School of Biology and Ecology, spoke with the Aroostook Republican about his research results involving Colorado potato cannibalism. He found that in a laboratory, Colorado potato beetles facing starvation and crowding ate beetle eggs and young beetles and injured beetles and other adults. Alyokhin said while it’s a laboratory study […]

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potato beetle

To protect crops, farmers could promote potato beetle cannibalism

Colorado potato beetles can decimate spud crops by devouring the plants’ foliage. That’s a big problem for farmers in Maine where the 2016 potato harvest was valued at more than $142 million. There’s more unsettling news — each female Colorado potato beetle can lay about 600 eggs in a growing season. And the species — […]

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NH Public Radio interviews Longcore about deadly fungus affecting frogs

New Hampshire Public Radio spoke with Joyce Longcore, a chytrid researcher in the University of Maine’s School of Biology and Ecology, for the report “Will a deadly fungus destroy N.H.’s frog population? The answer is complicated.” Since it was first discovered, the chytrid fungus known as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis or BD, has been implicated in massive […]

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Drummond speaks with BDN about fungus that could affect Maine’s blueberries

The Bangor Daily News interviewed Frank Drummond, an insect ecology professor at the University of Maine, about a type of fungus with zombie-like qualities that could threaten the state’s wild blueberry crop. Drummond said although the mummy berry disease is probably the most serious blueberry disease, it’s not well understood. Drummond and other UMaine researchers […]

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UMaine scientists appear in iSWOOP video

The University of Maine is well represented in an iSWOOP (interpreters and Scientists Working On Our Parks) video that highlights the importance of scientists to national parks, including Acadia National Park. Martha Merson’s three-minute video includes footage of assistant professor Jacquelyn Gill speaking at a public event, doctoral candidate Kit Hamley coring, and alum Nickolay […]

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