Research

hemlock

UMaine-led team predicts increasing decline of hemlock as winters warm

Land managers in New England and eastern New York state have a new tool to help identify eastern hemlock stands at greatest risk for rapid growth decline by evaluating stresses on the trees, including response to the hemlock woolly adelgid and changes resulting from a warming climate. Today, an estimated 26 percent of the region’s […]

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sonja birthesil in the weeds greenhouse

Birthisel investigates solutions to climate change challenges

Thanks to generous support from the Correll Fellowship, Sonja Birthisel explores solutions to challenges climate change is creating for farmers. The Ph.D. candidate in UMaine’s interdisciplinary Ecology and Environmental Sciences program also uses her research to introduce high school students to STEM fields, providing teenage interns opportunities to develop independent research projects. Watch to find […]

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Nurse Educator journal features School of Nursing disaster simulation

Kelley Strout, assistant professor of nursing, is the lead author of “Interprofessional Mass Casualty Incident Simulation Design Protocol to Prepare Prelicensure Nursing Students to Respond to a Disaster,” in the journal Nurse Educator. The simulation on campus in April 2016 was designed to train nursing students and first responders. It featured a simulated bus accident […]

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ed grew feature geology rock

Anthropocene mineralogy and the dawn of a new geological epoch

There are roughly 5,200 officially recognized minerals on planet Earth according to the International Mineralogical Association (IMA). Two of which — Edgrewite and hydroxyledgrewite — are named after University of Maine mineralogist and petrologist Edward Grew. Grew, a research professor in the School of Earth and Climate Sciences, has studied and helped discover new minerals […]

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orland lidar contour screen

Barbara Wheatland Geospatial Programs provides remote sensing for town of Orland

The University of Maine’s School of Forest Resources recently finished an innovative remote sensing application for the town of Orland. The Barbara Wheatland Geospatial Programs’ aerial monitoring team produced a high-resolution orthophoto — an aerial photograph that has been geometrically corrected to have a uniform scale — and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) analysis for […]

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lake saros climate research

Biogeochemical links across Greenland key to understanding Arctic

The Kangerlussuaq region of southwest Greenland is a 3,728-square-mile corridor stretching from the ice sheet to the Labrador Sea. In this area near the top of the world, landscape and ecosystem diversity abounds. Flora and fauna range from microbes in the ice sheet to large herbivores — caribou and musk oxen — living on the […]

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lobster age marine

Darling Marine Center researchers test technique to determine lobster’s age

Research professor Rick Wahle and graduate student Carl Huntsberger are testing a technique at the University of Maine Darling Marine Center to determine the age of lobsters. Unlike fish, mollusks and trees, Wahle says lobsters and other crustaceans molt — or cast off their skeletons thereby discarding external signs of growth. That means a lobster’s […]

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2017-2-13 Aging-Bangor-News-feature

UMaine Center on Aging helps Bangor become more livable for seniors

When AARP announced last summer that Bangor would be named the 100th community in the country to earn “age-friendly” status, leaders in Maine’s third-largest city had to make a big commitment. To receive this distinction, a city must agree to devise a comprehensive strategy to become more livable for its oldest residents. AARP had already […]

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salmon eggs

Researchers help salmon farmers confront threat to their industry

It’s a mystery that has puzzled University of Maine assistant professor of marine biology and aquaculture Heather Hamlin and the salmon farming industry in New England: the decline in egg survival. The survival rate of fertilized salmon eggs had been as high as 80 percent. But beginning in 2000, salmon embryos began dying in large […]

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gill algae tar pit

Gill examines plants encased in tar pits to reconstruct ice age ecosystem

For tens of thousands of years, the warm, sticky natural asphalt that occasionally bubbled to the Earth’s surface in the area now called Los Angeles was a death sentence for some ice age animals. Woolly mammoths, camels, rabbits, horses, bison, sloths, rodents, snails, turtles, birds and saber-toothed cats perished after becoming mired in the liquid […]

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